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Photo Information

Col. Phillip W. Boggs, (right), relinquishes his duties as commanding officer of 10th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, to Col. Bradley R. Hall during a change of command ceremony July 15, 2011, aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Photo by Cpl. Andrew D. Johnston

Boggs leads artillery to the 21st century—leaves big shoes to fill

18 Jul 2011 | Cpl. Andrew D. Johnston

Friends, families, Marines and sailors gathered for a change of command ceremony July 15, 2011, aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., during which Col. Phillip W. Boggs relinquished his duties as commanding officer of 10th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, to Col. Bradley R. Hall.

 “Phillip, as you relinquish command from 10th Marine Regiment, do so with a tremendous sense of pride and accomplishment. The performance of this fine battalion is nothing short of historic,” said Brig. Gen. W. Lee Miller, the acting commanding general of 2nd MarDiv.

In typical Marine Corps fashion, Boggs handed the unit colors to his counterpart, and Hall officially took control of the battalion.

A chest pounding thud ripped through the air as cannons blasted rounds through the sky. The historically symbolic display of artillery’s firepower engulfed the crowd with a cloud of smoke. Boggs approached the parade deck and turned to the crowd.

 “I would like to start off with a famous quote from Thomas Paine, ‘These are the times that try men’s souls’,” said Boggs.

What he was referring to was the challenge he took on with transforming 10th Regiment into the powerhouse it is known for today. When Boggs originally came on deck, he said he was a little concerned about where his unit stood in—“The needs of the Marine Corps.”

“Are we irrelevant? Are we a cold war relic? Are we something of the industrial age and not a part of the information age?” said Boggs.

Boggs got straight to work and simultaneously trained and deployed units to Afghanistan. He made it a point to make sure his, “Kings of the battlefield,” didn’t become a relic.

Over the past several years, Boggs said the artillery community morphed into a multi-purpose task force that proved no matter what the circumstances are, any type of Marine unit can, “Adapt and overcome.”

“We have been civil affairs, military police, infantry, trucks; you name it we did it,” said Boggs. Keeping his composure, Boggs took time to thank all of the people who helped him get to where he is. He wanted everyone to know that the successes of the regiment was a combination of true leadership and dedication from the Marines and sailors who served.

“You have done everything I have asked of you and you have exceeded my standards; and the Marine Corps’ standards,” Boggs said to the regiment.

A steady breeze waved the American Flag in the background. The 2nd MarDiv Band clashed their symbols and led the regiment in a final farewell march. Both colonels stood at attention and saluted the passing troops as they gave their final parting.

Hall was proud to carry on the legacy of the regiment and proudly took the reins as commanding officer.

“What I can promise you is that I will do my best,” Hall said to the crowd. “There will be no one that works harder in this regiment than myself to ensure that we— together as a family and a team—continue the 10th Marines legacy.”