2nd Tanks conducts training with UAVs

By Lance Cpl. Jose A. Mendez Jr. | 2nd Marine Division | October 21, 2013

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Smoke covers an M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank with 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, after it fires the main gun at Range SR-10, during a training exercise with an RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Oct. 15, 2013. The tank crews worked alongside scouts, who controlled the UAVs. The UAVs collected reconnaissance on the enemy and relayed the information to the tank crews before they attacked the objective.

Smoke covers an M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank with 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, after it fires the main gun at Range SR-10, during a training exercise with an RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Oct. 15, 2013. The tank crews worked alongside scouts, who controlled the UAVs. The UAVs collected reconnaissance on the enemy and relayed the information to the tank crews before they attacked the objective. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jose A. Mendez Jr. )


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An M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank with 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, rolls through Range SR-10, during a training exercise with an RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Oct. 15, 2013. The tank crews worked alongside scouts, who controlled the UAVs. The UAVs collected reconnaissance on the enemy and relayed the information to the tank crews before they headed they attacked the objective.

An M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank with 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, rolls through Range SR-10, during a training exercise with an RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Oct. 15, 2013. The tank crews worked alongside scouts, who controlled the UAVs. The UAVs collected reconnaissance on the enemy and relayed the information to the tank crews before they headed they attacked the objective. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jose A. Mendez Jr. )


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Smoke exits the main gun of an M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank with 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, after it fires the main gun at Range SR-10, during a training exercise with an RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Oct. 15, 2013. The tank crews worked alongside scouts, who controlled the UAVs. The UAVs collected reconnaissance on the enemy and relayed the information to the tank crews before they attacked the objective.

Smoke exits the main gun of an M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank with 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, after it fires the main gun at Range SR-10, during a training exercise with an RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Oct. 15, 2013. The tank crews worked alongside scouts, who controlled the UAVs. The UAVs collected reconnaissance on the enemy and relayed the information to the tank crews before they attacked the objective. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jose A. Mendez Jr. )


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An RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, from 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, lays on the observation tower during a training exercise with M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tanks, Oct. 15, 2013. “The Ravens give you a good birds-eye view, they receive reconnaissance that can be too far out to see,” said Cpl. Peter J. Richter, a Raven operator with Scouts, 2nd Tanks, and Native of Dexter, Mich. “They also are very good for locating and navigating bad terrain such as swamps.”

An RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, from 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, lays on the observation tower during a training exercise with M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tanks, Oct. 15, 2013. “The Ravens give you a good birds-eye view, they receive reconnaissance that can be too far out to see,” said Cpl. Peter J. Richter, a Raven operator with Scouts, 2nd Tanks, and Native of Dexter, Mich. “They also are very good for locating and navigating bad terrain such as swamps.” (Photo by Lance Cpl. Jose A. Mendez Jr. )


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MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE --

Marines with 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, conducted a training exercise aboard Range SR-10, which integrated the M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank and the RQ-11 Raven Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Oct. 15.
 
The objective of the training was to test out the scouting capabilities of the UAV. Proper scouting reports from the UAV may contain the number of enemies, how far out the enemies are and what threat the enemy shows.
 
“The Ravens give you a good birds-eye view, they receive reconnaissance that can be too far out to see,” said Cpl. Peter J. Richter, a Raven operator with Scout and TOW platoon, 2nd Tanks, and Native of Dexter, Mich. “They also are very good for locating and navigating bad terrain such as swamps.”
 
The approximately seven-pound UAV helps scout enemies with the camera attached to the Raven’s nose. Once the Raven receives reconnaissance on the enemy, it returns down range where the information is given to the tank crews.
 
After the tank crews received the enemy report, they headed up the range and engaged the targets.
 
Completing the training improved the Raven operators and tank crews integration and teamwork.
 
“It breaks up the monotony of training by showing us something new and effective,” said Richter.

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