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Photo Information

This sign naming Observation Post 4 was created to honor Lance Cpl. Michael V. Postal, a Queens, N.Y. native, fellow Marine and friend, who was killed in action from an improvised explosive device during a convoy in Company L?s area of operations.

Photo by Lance Cpl. Athanasios L. Genos

Camp named after fallen Marine;

9 Jun 2005 | Lance Cpl. Athanasios L. Genos

Everyone who drives through the entrance of Observation Post 4 sees an Eagle Globe and Anchor with writing around it which says “Camp Postal” April 5, 1984 to May 5, 2005.

The sign was created to honor Lance Cpl. Michael V. Postal, a Queens, N.Y. native, fellow Marine and friend, who was killed in action from an improvised explosive device during a convoy in Company L’s area of operations.

Third Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment decided to change the name of the company’s forward operating post to Camp Postal, following Postal’s death.

“Everyone knew Postal, and this was a fitting way to remember him here,” explained Capt. Brian Jenkins, Company L commander. 

The company staff decided to have a sign made to honor their fallen brother-in-arms and put it near the entrance of the compound while setting up camp at OP 4.

Lance Cpl. Kyle B. Brothers, a Lebanon, Pa., native, was chosen by the company staff to complete the sign.

“I really think he would have appreciated the sign we made for him,” explained the 2002 Cedar Crest High School graduate.

Brothers completed the sign in approximately two weeks while still performing his day-to-day responsibilities such as patrolling and standing post.  He put much thought and effort into making the sign. 

The company didn’t want something put together quickly.  They wanted something well designed to honor the memory of Postal.

“Over a time of about two weeks I was able to draw it and get it all painted. It actually took about four days time to do it over the two weeks,” Brothers said. 

The Marines wanted to remember Postal in a lasting way, making sure he will never be forgotten and his legacy will be carried with them every time they leave their compound as they fight the Global War on Terrorism.

“To those of us who knew him, we will never forget him,” Sgt. Edward J. Somuk, a New Milford, Conn., native, said.  “I think that Mike represented what we truly stand for, he left his home in New York and sacrificed everything to bring freedom to those back home.”