Photo Information

Marines from 3rd Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment barge into a room to clear it of any insurgents hiding inside at the military operations on urban terrain facility here, June 7. During this training, the Marines are taught how to maneuver in an urban environment. Photo by Josephh Stahlman

Photo by Josephh Stahlman

Marines trained to survive in urban environment

16 Jun 2006 | Pfc. Josephh Stahlman

Marines from 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment and 3rd  Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment trained at the military operations on urban terrain facility here June 5.

During the five-day training exercise, the Marines were taught how to properly patrol through a village, clear different sized buildings with insurgents inside and use different techniques while maneuvering through buildings.

“During the first two days of MOUT training, we teach the Marines different aspects about urban terrain and how to maneuver while inside them,” said Cpl. Joel W. Winkler, a basic urban skills training instructor who has two deployments to Iraq.

“The first two days are taught in a classroom and the other three are taught in MOUT town,” said the 20-year-old Winkler, a Durham, N.C., native.

The town is made up of a hospital, bank, school, church and a number of other buildings. The Marines maneuver through the buildings while going through different scenarios. Clearing buildings with insurgents inside, counter-sniper maneuvers, and different ways of entering buildings are just a few of the scenarios the Marines go through.

Winkler said the Marines are taught different situations that might happen while deployed to a forward position. Breaking down while inside them,” said Cpl. Joel W. Winkler, a basic urban skills training instructor who has two deployments to Iraq.

“The first two days are taught in a classroom and the other three are taught in MOUT town,” said the 20-year-old Winkler, a Durham, N.C., native.

The town is made up of a hospital, bank, school, church and a number of other buildings. The Marines maneuver through the buildings while going through different scenarios. Clearing buildings with insurgents inside, counter-sniper maneuvers, and different ways of entering buildings are just a few of the scenarios the Marines go through.

Winkler said the Marines are taught different situations that might happen while deployed to a forward position. Breaking down doors to search a building or clearing buildings of insurgents is common on patrols in Iraq.

“A lot of the things we are taught here are very important because they are used every day over in Iraq when clearing buildings or patrolling villages,” said Cpl. Sidney C. Moore, a field artilleryman with 3rd Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment, who was deployed to Iraq in March 2005.

To add to the realism of the training, Winkler said the Marines are given simulation rounds during the final days of training.

Simulation rounds are plastic projectiles filled with colored laundry detergent and are used to simulate being hit with an actual bullet. By using these rounds the Marines get experience reloading their weapons under fire and learn to conserve ammunition during a fire fight.
doors to search a building or clearing buildings of insurgents is common on patrols in Iraq.

“A lot of the things we are taught here are very important because they are used every day over in Iraq when clearing buildings or patrolling villages,” said Cpl. Sidney C. Moore, a field artilleryman with 3rd Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment, who was deployed to Iraq in March 2005.

To add to the realism of the training, Winkler said the Marines are given simulation rounds during the final days of training.

Simulation rounds are plastic projectiles filled with colored laundry detergent and are used to simulate being hit with an actual bullet. By using these rounds the Marines get experience reloading their weapons under fire and learn to conserve ammunition during a fire fight.

“The sim rounds are kind of like paint balls, but hurt a lot worse,” said Moore, a Dracut, Mass., native. “Getting shot with them also quickens your reaction time.”

Winkler said communication and teamwork while in a firefight are some of the biggest things taught at MOUT.

“The entire exercise teaches us how to go into a building, clear it of insurgents, and come back out alive,” Moore said.

Marines will be using the tactics they learned at MOUT during their deployments overseas. Moore said the Marines can use this training to effectively accomplish their mission while keeping each other alive.

“The key to any operation is getting the mission accomplished without sacrificing a life,” Moore said.

2nd Marine Division